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This week SBID delved behind the scenes with one of our student design competition judges, Jane Hay, the International Managing Director for Christie’s Education. As students across the UK have been celebrating the announcement of the Designed for Business category finalists, revealed on Monday 29th October 2018, Jane shared her advice about curating creative careers and how she would choose to spend the £30,000 prize fund to help kick-start a career in the competitive industry.

Can you describe your current job?

I am the International Managing Director for Christie’s Education, a global division of the world’s leading art business, Christie’s.

Christie’s Education is a specialist provider of higher and continuing education, and an internationally recognised centre of academic excellence in the study of art business and the art market, art history and art world ecosystems, curating and connoisseurship. We offer master’s degrees in London and New York, and are dedicated to preparing students for entry into the art world, placing great importance on analytical skills, object-based learning, research and scholarship, and the practical experience of art and business as the keys to professional success. We also offer a wide range of continuing education opportunities, both online and on location in London, New York and Hong Kong, designed to introduce the fundamentals of art, collecting and art business.

Jane Hay, Managing Director of Christies Education feature for SBID interior design blog, The Judges Insight, Designed for Business student design competition

What is your background and how did you get into your industry?

My father was an art teacher and latterly an antique dealer. Appreciation of art and design, and its role in creating our social fabric, was a theme running throughout my childhood. I was very lucky to secure a job at Christie’s by writing to them and asking if there were any positions available. Since then I’ve held several positions in the company, including Specialist, Auctioneer, Global Divisional Director and UK Managing Director of Christie’s. I have now been at Christie’s for thirty years, including six years at Christie’s Education.

Jane Hay, Managing Director of Christies Education feature for SBID interior design blog, The Judges Insight, Designed for Business student design competition

Which people do you admire most in the industry and why?

I most admire those who have deep knowledge and expertise in their chosen field, are generous with that knowledge, and continue to look for ways to challenge and innovate.

How do you feel about being a judge for SBID’s new student design competition?

I welcome every opportunity to support young creatives. The Designed for Business student design competition should have a significant impact for the eventual winner’s career prospects, so I am excited to be part of it.

How did you find your judging experience?

We considered works of a very high standard from across all categories. I was impressed by the dynamism of the entrants and their ability to connect deeply and creatively with topical issues and to use their talents to communicate ideas in ways that could have real commercial potential.

What advice would you give a young designer starting out in the industry?

Immerse yourself in the creative hub in your city, live where the creative people live and work, and insert yourself into their world. Spend six months listening before you start selling yourself – you will learn a lot. Any job is better than no job; it’s about being there and gaining visibility. Be part of the conversation.

If you had won £30,000 just after graduating from University, what would you have done with it?

I would have rented live-work space in the creative hub I just referred to and got to work! There is no substitute for hard work.

Click here to find out more about this year’s Designed for Business judging panel or visit our website here for further announcements and information about this inaugural student design competition!

In keeping with the aim of global design excellence for the next generation, we gathered the world’s best experts across five competitive creative sectors to be judges in the SBID & BEOPEN Student Design Competition, Designed for Business. On Tuesday 18th September, we rounded up this panel of esteemed professionals to discuss, deliberate and decide on our fortunate finalists and lucky winners for each of the creative categories across Interior Design, Interior Decoration, Product Design, Art and Fashion. The finalists are set to be announced on Monday 29th October 2018!

Following our interview with the Founder of HG DesignWorks, Hans Galutera, we spoke with Architect and Courser Leader, Russell Gagg to discover what he has learned from working in architectural practice since the 90’s, before becoming a degree level educator.

Can you describe your current job?

I am currently Course Leader and Principal Lecturer of BA (Hons) Interior Architecture and Design at the Arts University Bournemouth.

What is your background and how did you get into interior design?

Having graduated, I entered the Manchester architectural scene in the early ‘90s – an environment that was dynamic and highly competitive. The city was enjoying a re-birth and understood that the re-use of its industrial heritage was the best route to a sustainable future. At the time, a small number of practices shared this understanding and pushed themselves to create ever-more progressive architecture which would meet the demands of urban growth. Working for them was equally demanding but also rewarding, enabling young architects such as me to gain diverse and invaluable experience across a wide range of design. You were expected to learn quickly, be adaptable, resourceful and resilient and to meet deadlines; you were also expected to challenge the norm and take creative risks. It was tough – it still is tough – but it was worth it when you see people enjoying a city that you played a part in rebuilding.

Over a period of some fifteen years I worked in architectural practice in Manchester, Kuala Lumpur and Singapore. After a year travelling around Central and South America we settled in New Zealand where I spent a short time in practice and then started teaching architecture at undergraduate and post-graduate levels at the Victoria University of Wellington.

This experience enabled me to apply for the leadership of the Interior Architecture and Design course at the Arts University, where I have been since 2006. It’s a great job in a dynamic institution and I share this with highly creative staff and students. Together we have grown and developed the course to become one of the largest and most progressive in the UK – a course which really challenges the accepted boundaries of what the “interior” can be.

Which people do you admire most in the industry and why?

There are many highly successful individuals and practices. What I most admire is the adaptability, dynamism and skills of the industry itself. Interior design practitioners are experts at understanding the potential of design opportunities and applying their creativity to grasp those opportunities – it really is the most exciting area of design.

How do you feel about being a judge for this new student design competition?

This is one of those opportunities. The SBID Design for Business student competition will have such an impact on the lives and careers of those who enter. For the winners, it could really be a game-changer.

How did you find your judging experience?

It was such a pleasure to see such a high standard of work from across all the categories and to listen to the comments from design experts and industry leaders in those fields. I hope the students enjoyed their projects because the judges certainly enjoyed looking at them.

What advice would you give a young designer starting out in the industry?

Patience. You have to work hard. Enjoy yourself when things go well and reflect critically when they do not. Accept that this all takes time and does not happen instantly. Working in the creative industries is immensely rewarding but that reward only comes to those who stick with it and keep working at it.

If you had won £30,000 just after graduating from University, what would you have done with it?

I would travel  – there is no better inspiration.

Click here to find out more about this year’s Designed for Business judging panel or visit our website, here, for further announcements and information about this inaugural, life-changing student competition!

In keeping with the aim of global design excellence for the next generation, we gathered the world’s best experts across five competitive creative sectors to be judges in the SBID & BEOPEN Student Design Competition. On Tuesday 18th September, we rounded up this panel of esteemed professionals to discuss, deliberate and decide on our 15 fortunate finalists for each of the creative categories across Interior Design, Interior Decoration, Product Design, Art and Fashion. The finalists are set to be announced on Monday 29th October 2018!

We interviewed our judge; leading global hospitality Designer and Founder of HG DesignWorks, Hans J. Galutera to get insight on his experience within the industry. He shares his valuable advice for students and young designers alike who are about to embark on their journey into the diverse field of design.

Can you describe your current job?

Having worked on multiple public spaces on the largest cruise-liners and some of the most technological ships of the world, I am now focusing work on hotels –  primarily restaurants, bars and lounges which are currently in construction in my hometown Melbourne, Australia. I am also working on a number of luxury residential properties in New York City and Asbury Park New Jersey.W

What is your background and how did you get into interior design?

My background is in interior architectural design. I graduated from Melbourne College of Decoration in Australia and then further studied in the Bachelor of Fine Arts majoring in Interior Design Magna Cum Laude in FIT SUNY in New York City in the United States. I then apprenticed for prestigious high-end architectural design firms such as Daniel Romualdez Architects, CITE Design and Birch Coffey Design Associates. Shortly after in New York City Feb 2002, I established my own multidisciplinary firm with an Italian business partner to form BG Studio International Inc. which encompassed all aspects of design – from commercial and residential interiors to furniture, products, exhibitions, and graphics. In 2004, the studio began specializing in maritime hospitality design onboard Royal Caribbean International’s Enchantment of the Seas. This is the first ever lengthening project of a ship cut in half and rejoined to create revenue generating spaces for the second biggest owners of cruiseliners of the world. Since then, signature restaurants have been created for celebrity chefs on Celebrity Cruises Specialty Restaurants and largest ships of the world at the moment – Oasis of the Seas, Allure of the Seas and Harmony of the Seas just to name a few. My most memorable and ultimate best design was the Penthouse Suite with the prize-winning Celebrity Cruises Reflection of the Seas for the Society of British International Design awarded at the House of Lords in London, UK.

Which people do you admire most in the industry and why?

It really depends but in terms of inspiration I am always drawn to iconic legendary designers. I am an avid admirer of French designers such as Jean Michel Frank who is often known as a minimalist, but his layering of rich textures and luxurious materials give a sense of maximalism that makes his work so interesting and complex; Andre Arbus furniture designer, sculptor and architect; Jean Prouve whose furniture is a wonderful blend of architecture and engineering; and America’s William Haines for his courageous story as an actor turned interior designer, and one of the progenitors of interior design’s Hollywood Regency period. There are so many!

How do you feel about being a judge for this new student design competition?

I think this design competition is quite unique as it combines all facets of creatives from fashion, product and interior design, but most importantly – the big cash prize which will really make a difference in a student’s life. It would be interesting to see the student’s career follow up and the amazing things that could potentially be life changing for the economy and perhaps the world with their design cleverness and solutions.

How did you find your judging experience?

The judging experience was very well organised as it is always a challenge to carefully vet and decide on multiple criteria, especially with the various design categories. Also I think having the judges reconvene and continue to debate the comparative merits of each design project is a wonderful way to reaffirm the final prize winner.

What advice would you give a young designer starting out in the industry?

Travel, Educate, Absorb Culture! Be humble and watch out for your ego. It is the number one obstacle that stops you as pride will always get in the way and then you head for a great big stumble. After over 20 years of doing this, I am still learning that. And finally, as the old cliche says – “do what you love and you will never work another day in your life…” 

If you had won £30,000 just after graduating from University, what would you have done with it?

If I had won that top prize, the first thing I would do is pay off my student loans and if there is any left then I’d book a holiday to my favourite vacation spot!

Click here to find out more about this year’s Designed for Business judging panel or visit our website, here, for further announcements and information about this inaugural student design competition!

With the launch of the SBID national Student Design Competition for third year students and recent graduates this summer, the competition is now in full swing as we enter into the final month before the entries officially close on Friday 31st August!

This brand new student competition is aimed to identify, recognise and promote creative talent of young students, their university tutor and achievement learned. Students from across Fashion, Interior Design, Product Design and Art are invited to submit their end of year project for a chance to win a £30,000 cash prize.

In keeping with the aim of global design excellence for the next generation, we gathered the world’s best experts across five competitive creative sectors to be judges. We spoke with one of our many distinguished judges; Leading International Designer, Sebastian Conran; to get his view on this exciting (not to mention life-changing) opportunity for young designers across the UK, as well as share his insight and advice for students looking to enter!

 

Student Design Competition Designed for Business artwork

How do you feel about being a judge for this new student design competition?

I have been judging student competitions since 1988  starting with the RSA [ironically I never won it when I was a student]. My main observation is that many great ideas are lost through poor or over-detailed presentation. First state the unmet need, then issues, then big idea, then why it will benefit users – any more detail can follow later.

As a judge for a competition like this, what will you be looking for from a winning entry?

Realism combined with imagination, innovation and entrepreneurial flair.

What advice would you give a young designer starting out in the industry?

Never try and start your own business unless you have worked for a business similar to the one you want to start – learning by your own mistakes can be painful!

If you had won £30,000 after just graduating from University, what would you have done with it?

Go on a world trip to Japan, California, New York, Scandinavia and see what it is like to work there for a bit – maybe as 3 month internships – learn and save as much as I can for when I am ready to start my own business!

If you feel inspired to submit your work for the chance to win £30,000, click here to find out more or enter now!

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