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Project of the Week

This week’s instalment of the #SBIDinspire interior design series features a prestigious residential property in the heart of Mayfair with the restoration of a grade II listed townhouse in one of London’s most illustrious addresses for the rental market. Working in close collaboration with Schiller Beynon Interior Design, Shape London, and Cumming Corporation, Portview applied their artisan skills in craftsmanship to uncover a plethora of classical, period features that complement the chic, contemporary interior. Spread over five floors, the spacious property is the perfect retreat from the hustle and bustle of city living, with large, expansive rooms that boast opulent ceilings and ample natural light. Positioned just 0.1 miles from Hyde Park and 0.6 miles from Bond Street, the property offers the city’s most popular leisure destinations just around the corner.

Sector: Residential Design

Company: Portview Fit Out Specialists

Project: Mayfair Townhouse Restoration

Location: London, United Kingdom

What was the client’s brief? 

The brief was to inject the house with a new lease of life by restoring the beautiful period features throughout the property and combine them with new, premium quality finishes and a contemporary colour palette. Essentially, our task was to mix the old with the new to create a very understated, yet luxurious interior that is compatible with modern living.

What inspired the interior design of the project? 

As this was a residential refurbishment for the rental market, we used our experience in restoring listed properties to deliver an interior that retained its historical integrity to uncover and develop period features into a number of unique selling points.

The house comprises of two reception rooms, a large dining room, and a ground floor drawing room that is located just off the main entrance hall where a stunning console table made of marble, metal and painted wood, awaits. The vestibule area on the first floor – dressed minimally with beautiful basket weave oak flooring – is particularly impressive as an ideal space for entertaining guests.

The master bedroom occupies the second floor and benefits from a separate dressing room and marble clad bathroom that has been finished with a bronze trim and matching brassware. An additional three bedrooms are located on the third floor, each tastefully dressed to the same exacting standard.

From top to bottom, elements of surprise await guests at every level. A great example of this is a roof terrace which boasts stunning views of the surrounding area, ideal for relaxing in the sunshine or socialising casually with friends.

For the lower ground floor, a further bedroom (and bathroom) can be found. In addition, the family kitchen offers a more informal dining space and features a rear, private entrance via the patio garden.

What was the toughest hurdle your team overcame during the project?

Working with a listed building presents a number of unique challenges. In this case our biggest challenge was the grand nineteenth century staircase, which was actually installed in the mid-1800s from another building. To make it structurally sound, we had to work closely with our engineers and the listed building officer to position the staircase in the correct place, level it out and make it fit for purpose.

In addition, the basement comprised of a lot of small, tiny rooms that needed to be opened out to create more classically proportioned spaces that are in keeping with the architectural style of the building.

What was your team’s highlight of the project?

The transformation has really been quite remarkable and it’s all largely down to the great relationships we have with our project partners. The Portview team work tirelessly to ensure every detail is carefully considered and that every finish is crafted to the highest standard. The biggest highlight by far is the fact that we exceeded the client’s expectations and that they are very happy with the finished look.

Questions answered by Simon Campbell, Managing Director at Portview

If you missed last week’s Project of the Week featuring Discovery’s new, inspiring and 5-star green rated head office which stands as an architectural landmark in South Africa, click here to see more.

We hope you feel inspired by this week’s residential design! Let us know what inspired you #SBIDinspire

Portview Fit Out

Portview Fit Out residential design project images for SBID interior design blog, Project of the Week
Portview Fit Out residential design project images for SBID interior design blog, Project of the Week
Portview Fit Out residential design project images for SBID interior design blog, Project of the Week
Portview Fit Out residential design project images for SBID interior design blog, Project of the Week
Portview Fit Out residential design project images for SBID interior design blog, Project of the Week
Portview Fit Out residential design project images for SBID interior design blog, Project of the Week

Project of the Week

This week’s instalment of the #SBIDinspire interior design series features a historic high-rise given new life with contemporary design concepts. The new office space is designed with sleek, contemporary elegance and the creation of unique angular dimensions. The design was developed with the preservation of historical monuments in mind as the building was placed under preservation for its historic, architectural quality. The elegance and generous proportions, together with a mix of unusual, high-quality materials and a striking lighting design concept, distinguish the office areas and conference zones across the four floors. With regard to the architectural quality of the building and the demands of the customer, the combination of materials used was inspired by the building’s original era – with modern interpretation. Black marble, brass, carbon and glass runs throughout the entire interior design scheme.

Sector: Office Design

Company: Landau + Kindelbacher

Project: Real Estate Office of Landau + Kindelbacher

Location: Zurich, Switzerland

What was the client’s brief? 

The Swiss branch of a property developer wanted us to take on the interior design for their new representative office. Including office areas and a conference zone over a total of four storeys with an area of about 100 square meters, and at the same time to take monument conservation into consideration.

What inspired the interior design of the project? 

The Hochhaus zur Bastei, designed by the famous Zurich Architect, Werner Stücheli and completed in 1955, is considered the first high-rise building in the city of Zurich. Situated directly on the Schwanzengraben, the tower block sets an urban development accent and acts as a gateway to the city. As an example of high architectural quality, the Hochhaus zur Bastei was placed under a preservation order a few years ago.

With regard to the architectural quality of the Bastei tower and the representative demands of the customer, a unique material combination of black marble (polished Nero Marquina), brass, carbon and glass was selected for use across the floors, walls and ceilings. As a reminiscence of the architecture of the 1950s, the classical materials are newly interpreted in their use, colourfulness and gloss value. Like a passe-partout, the resulting spatial effect frames the view and allows the low room heights of the existing building to retreat into the background.

Designed with a sleek, contemporary elegance and generous proportions, the mix of unusual, high-quality materials and accentuated lighting systems help to distinguish the office areas and conference zones. In contrast to the black space continuum is the high-gloss furniture, highly polished brass elements and golden lighting channels to make the design features stand out and illuminate against this dark, black backdrop.

What was the toughest hurdle your team overcame during the project?

The greatest challenge in this project was to combine the conditions presented by the existing situation with the requirements of a contemporary office world.

What was your team’s highlight of the project?

The furniture and fittings were mostly designed and individually installed on site by Landau + Kindelbacher. A speciality is the floor pattern with the brass seams as a visible, high-quality separation. The subject of ‘seams’ is mirrored again and again in the whole design – from the integration of direct and indirect lighting in the cooling ceiling to the special furniture.

Why did you enter the SBID International Design Awards?

We consider the SBID International Design Awards to be an excellent platform for presenting us and our projects to an international audience.

Questions answered by Gerhard Landau and Ludwig Kindelbacher, Managing Partners at Landau Kindelbacher

If you missed last week’s Project of the Week featuring a show home which blends artistic, Oriental concepts with modern design, click here to see more.

We hope you feel inspired by this week’s office design! Let us know what inspired you #SBIDinspire

Landau + Kindelbacher | SBID International Design Awards

Project of the Week

This week’s instalment of the #SBIDinspire interior design series took a dilapidated former department store from 1906 and re-imagined it to create an inspiring and multi-disciplinary architecture and design practice. The building was stripped of years of incremental additions to reveal original features. Existing interiors were assessed to ensure that elements such as 111-year-old Burmese teak flooring, a grand tiled-staircase and historic colours were preserved, as well as artworks created by squatters dating from the 1990s.

Voids cut through the building, provided volume and connections between levels. A striking reception and model-shop animate the ground floor, while a large basement event space includes cycle storage, changing-rooms and showers. Open-plan office design concepts were used to create workspaces and meeting areas which are also located on first to third floors. Topped by a new rooftop bar/restaurant for staff and the public, comprised of a series of oak-framed pavilions and a bespoke glazed dome that marks the end of a south-facing terrace.

Sector: Office Design

Company: Squire and Partners

Project: The Department Store

Project Location: London, United Kingdom

What was the client’s brief? 

Our brief was to take an unoccupied, dilapidated former department store from 1906 and re-imagine the building to create a series of inspiring office design which serves as work and social spaces for our multi-disciplinary architecture and design practice.

We sought to sensitively restore the Edwardian building, retaining and recycling as much of the building fabric as possible to bring it back to life, whilst also delivering a workplace that meets current and future needs in its offering of excellent facilities, with a forward-thinking approach to sustainability and wellbeing.

What inspired the interior design of the project? 

Stripping the building back to its raw state revealed a decayed grandeur and an extraordinary commitment to craft and detail by the original artisans. We looked to reveal and highlight these elements, in their found state, as well as exposing remnants left by more recent inhabitants, whilst adding a series of contemporary interventions in order to re-purpose the building as an inspiring modern workspace.

All aspects of the building’s history have been revealed, from its grand beginnings through to periods of misuse and decay, including a decade of use as a squat. Original graffiti sits alongside high end finishes, and modern furniture pieces co-exist with antique retail display cases in a highly curated interior filled with crafted curiosities which span the lifetime of the building.

What was the toughest hurdle your team overcame during the project?

Working with an existing building that had remained unoccupied (aside from squatters) and neglected for 40 years was challenging given its state of dilapidation. However, the building was of a robust construction, and after investigations it was decided that enough of the original fabric and character remained to provide a glimpse of its illustrious past and inform the approach of the new design, where possible embracing and capturing the building’s mistreatment over the decades.

A challenge during the restoration process was communicating to the build team the level of rawness and the overall aesthetic we wanted to achieve, as it was a non-standard finish and often a process of trial and error. During construction it was harder to see when surfaces were at their desired level of finish – we had a strong presence on site throughout the process and would stick signs to walls saying ‘this is finished’!

What was your team’s highlight of the project?

Re-activating the street level, which comprises a series of creative and retail units for local businesses, including an independent coffee roastery, café and record shop and a new home for the community Post Office. The café/bar at The Department Store’s apex is in the spirit of Café de Floris in Paris, which supported the original Bon Marché.

Squire and Partners’ own windows are utilised as a platform for creative arts within the local community, with a rolling programme that ranges from work by established and emerging artists to collaborations with local school children, as well offering views into the dedicated Downstairs events space used year round. These animated uses have transformed the building’s existing impermeable and hostile frontage into a friendly and open part of the community, bringing the building back into their hands following years of neglect.

Why did you enter the SBID International Design Awards?

The chance to be recognised by the SBID International Design Awards is a chance to be recognised internationally, by industry experts, and alongside the world’s leading designers of interiors.

Office Design by Squire & Partners
Squire and Partners, The Department Store office design project images for SBID interior design blog, Project of the Week

Questions answered by Tim Gledstone, Partner at Squire and Partners

If you missed last week’s Project of the Week featuring a traditional Cape Dutch style house inspired by South African street art, click here to see more.

We hope you feel inspired by this week’s office design! Let us know what inspired you #SBIDinspire

Squire and Partners  | SBID International Design Awards

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