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Workplace gurus have in recent years enjoyed looking through the generational lens to help predict behaviours and changes effecting corporate interior design. The impact that millennial’s have made upon the workplace for example, assisting organisations move from hierarchies to networks, has been significant. Attention is now being paid to the current school and university population – Gen Z or iGen (internet generation) born after 2000 and the suggestion is that technology impacts on design could continue to be profound.

SBID Education Council expert, Jim Taylour, Head of Design and Wellbeing at Orangebox sheds light on how workplaces and educational institutions should be adapting to suit this new wave of technology-fuelled behaviours.

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Project of the Week: SBID Awards Winners 2019

This week’s instalment of the #SBIDinspire interior design series features a nature-inspired property in Quintana Roo, Mexico which claimed the SBID Award for Overall Winner 2019. Centric to this award-winning design was the drive to redefine life in the jungle, promoting a non-invasive dialogue between architecture and its natural surroundings. Roth Architecture crafted this unique residence to harmoniously blend in with the environment, respecting and honouring the natural habitat that hosts it.

The use of ferro-cement was specifically chosen to avoid the introduction of heavy machinery into the jungle, thus preventing the felling of 250 trees. The finish, carefully crafted with local materials, makes this a unique space of purely organic forms.

SBID Awards: Overall Winner

Sector: Residential Design

Company: Roth Architecture

Project: Uh May Residence

Location: Quintana Roo, Mexico

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

What was the client’s brief? 

The client’s request was to achieve a harmonious way of cohabiting with the idiosyncratic ecosystem. The main instruction was to have the least possible interference with nature by not cutting any trees and leaving the surface of the soil intact. The fundamental precept to preserve the curvature of the earth and not to cut any trees in the 10 hectares guided every step of the project. Our intention is to show that we can build by learning from nature and integrating and building on its teachings.

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

What inspired the interior design of the project? 

The project was inspired by the shape of the Fibonacci spiral. The house unfolds akin to the shell of a snail, respecting the golden cut while effortlessly meandering through the network of trees.

The purpose that guided the construction of the project was the integration of the intelligence of nature’s networking, specifically the information contained in the shape of the surface of the earth and conveyed through the network of trees. The intelligence of Earth’s ecosystem has evolved over millions of years, gradually becoming more accurate. Connected through mycelium, a complex fungus network that is still being researched, trees communicate, help and protect each other.

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

What was the toughest hurdle your team overcame during the project?

The toughest hurdle was, precisely, to not sacrifice any trees. We had to develop new construction techniques to preserve the natural fabric of the surroundings. Everything had to be done manually and in an artisanal manner, which resulted in fostering the collaborative spirit and consolidating our tribe akin to the experience Mayans would have had at the time the pyramids were built.

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

What was your team’s highlight of the project?

For this project I worked for the first time with trained architects which was a new experience, especially since I never followed a formal curriculum myself. When I would trace the outline of the construction in the air with my hand, and the architects would first transpose it into drawings on paper.

Whereas the Mayan members of the team would immediately process the outline, almost like through a photographic process, and start building without previously translating the vision into a concept.

In the course of the project we could observe a cross pollination between the two approaches which was a highly rewarding experience.

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

Why did you enter the SBID Awards?

We are at a point in human evolution where it is necessary to redefine man’s place in the world through projects activating three fundamental pillars: art, nature and ancestral wisdom.

These three pillars inform not only each and every of our projects but also our organisational structure and the way we connect as a tribe.

Our architecture shows how human creation can harmoniously coexist with the natural world, a concept which was well understood by the original cultures who lived under these precepts and expressed them in a plastic way, with art and architecture operating as a bridge to the source.

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

Questions answered by Roth, Founder of Roth Architecture

If you missed last week’s Project of the Week featuring the first photography exhibit for famed Toronto photographer, click here to see more.

We hope you feel inspired by this week’s Residential design! Let us know what inspired you #SBIDinspire

SBID Awards 2019 | Overall Winner

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

Residential design by Roth Architecture for the Uh May Residence in Mexico

Can nature really increase our health and wellbeing? SBID Council expert, Oliver Heath is a qualified Domestic Energy and Green Deal Assessor who founded an architectural and interior design practice combining sustainability, consumer engagement and communications to inspire the uptake of future thinking in the built environment. He promotes happier, healthier places to live and work through his projects as designer, writer, and TV presenter. Oliver shares his thoughts with SBID on how Biophilic Design in interiors can impact health and wellbeing. 

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest spending time in nature can increase our health and wellbeing. In fact, healthcare experts are now prescribing time in nature to alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, we are spending less than 10% of our time outside,[i] and most of the time we do get to spend outside is still in the urban environment. So, what can we do when our day to day lives don’t support getting out into nature?

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For our series following wellness in interiors, SBID spoke with Interior Architect and Creative Director, Ann-marie Weekes, who’s extensive 17-year career in Interior Design and Architecture saw her amongst William Russell’s Architectural team designing Alexander McQueen’s international boutiques; working on multi-million pound projects from M&S’s environmentally sustainable flagship store in Cheshire Oaks, to Dunhill’s grade 2 listed Bourdon House in Mayfair. She also works very closely with the Orassy in London, who have an Integrative Medical Doctor and health practitioners who seek to understand the complex nature of ill health, whether it be mental, physical, emotional or environmental. With experience in both the interiors and the wellness sectors, Ann-marie shared her thoughtful perspective on introducing concepts of wellness and interior wellbeing into the designs of our homes to in turn, help us improve and remove toxicity from our modern day lifestyles. . .

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click here to find out more about becoming an SBID member.

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